Loading

 

Science Journal

 

Nature and Science
(Nat Sci
ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online); doi prefix: 10.7537, Monthly
Volume 14 - Number 3 (Cumulated No. 108), March 25, 2016
Cover Page (pdf), Cover (jpg), Introduction, Contents, Call for Papers, nsj1403

 

You can use the message in end of the article abstract to cite it.

To get Microsoft Documents: After you open the "Full Text" for each article, change the last 3 characters of the web address from .pdf to .doc (or .docx)

Welcome to send your manuscript to: sciencepub@gmail.com

When you submit manuscript(s), please mention that it is submitted to Nature and Science

Marsland Press, PO Box 180432, Richmond Hill, New York 11418, USA, 347-321-7172

http://www.sciencepub.net/nature

CONTENTS   

No.

Titles / Authors

Full

Text

No.

1

An impact of Quality Health Care Services on Oncology Patient Satisfaction at University Hospital

 

Sabah Mahmoud Ahmed Mahran 1, Elham Al Nagshabandi 2

 

1.& 2 PhD in Nursing. Department of Nursing Administration, Faculty of Nursing, Port Said University, Port Said, Egypt

2. Associate Professor, Department of Medical surgical in Nursing, Nursing College, King Abdulaziz University. Jeddah Saudi Arabia.

Email: dr.sabahmahran@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Background: Patient satisfaction has become an important point in the assessment of the quality of care, which is increasingly required by accreditation agencies in the monitoring of quality of hospital care. Moreover, satisfaction with care may influence patient compliance to the treatment and consequently, impact on disease outcome (Nguyen et al, 2014). Aim: Identity patient satisfaction level in oncology setting regarding Healthcare services at University Hospital. Design: Quantitative descriptive correlational study. Setting. Medical; surgical and gynecology wards (male and female) at King Abdulaziz University Hospital. Subjects & Methods: Total number of nonrandomized convenience samples were123 oncological patients who admitted to the above-mentioned setting. Oncology patient who is oriented and conscious included in the study. Tool: Data was collected by structured interview questionnaire for measuring patient satisfaction level toward health care services. Results: Study was done on 123 Oncology patients from medical, surgical and gynecology units at King Abdulaziz University Hospital. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Most common patients’ age were ranged from 41 to 50 years. 41.5% of studied sample complains of leukemia. About 47% treated with chemotherapy followed by surgery. Highly statistically significant relations were observed in the total level of patient’s satisfaction and care received from the physicians to the patient at p= .000. Studied samples satisfied from the knowledge and experience they give about illness; Information about medical tests; and information was given about treatment at (mean= 4.67). Conclusion: highly statistically significant relations were observed in the total levels of patient’s satisfaction, and care received from the nurses and physicians to the patient. The studied patients were satisfied from the knowledge and experience which given them about an illness; Medical tests; the way of the nurses carried out the physical examination; the way of handled nursing care and their human qualities. While, the interest to patient personally was low satisfaction.

[Mahran, S.M Al Nagshabandi, E. An impact of Quality Health Care Services on Oncology Patient Satisfaction at University Hospital. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):1-8]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 1.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.01

 

Keywords: Species richness; beta-diversity; taxonomic diversity; forest

Full Text

1

2

Fair hearing in the new Code of Criminal Procedure

 

Sajad joodaki rad 1, Dr. Salameh Abl hassani 2

 

1.  Department of law, Rāmhormoz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rāmhormoz, Iran

2.  Department of law, Rāmhormoz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rāmhormoz, Iran

 

Abstract: This paper reviews the achievements and innovations of the new law, it reviewed the terms of the offer. Due to the extensive study, it will follow in a few episodes. Due to the extensive discussion of this study, it was five seasons in the lift. The first chapter, an overview of the research were studied, studied literature will be the second season. The third chapter is devoted to the international standards of fair trial Yaft. dr the fourth quarter to review the achievements and innovations of the new Code of Criminal Procedure and finally in the fifth chapter is dedicated to the discussion and conclusions.

[Sajad joodaki rad, Dr. Salameh Abl hassani. Fair hearing in the new Code of Criminal Procedure. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):9-15]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 2.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.02

 

Key words: justice, due process, rules and nature of the proceedings, the new Code of Criminal Procedure

Full Text

2

3

Removal of nitrate ions from aqueous solution by modified sugarcane bagasse vermicompost

 

Laleh Divband Hafshejani1, Abd Ali Naseri 1, Abdolrahim Hooshmand 1, Fariborz Abbasi 2, Amir Soltani Mohammadi 1

 

1. Department of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Khuzestan, Iran

2. Agricultural Engineering Research Institute (AERI), Agricultural Research, Education & Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran

mdivband@gmail.com

 

Abstract: In this study, a series of experiments were conducted in batch condition to assess the performance of modified sugarcane bagasse vermicompost as adsorbent for removing nitrate ions from aqueous solution. The properties of modified vermicompost such as morphology, elemental contents, specific surface area, cation and anion exchange capacity were detected. The effect of different parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and common competing anions (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate and chloride) on nitrate removal was investigated. Result this study showed specific surface area, cation and anion exchange capacity of modified sugarcane bagasse vermicompost were 26.51 m2/g, 11.16 cmol/ kg and 7.76 cmol/kg, respectively. The optimum condition was observed at final solution pH of 3.78, after 120 min of contact time and with an adsorbent dose of 2 g/L. whit increasing temperature, nitrate removal increased. From between of competing anions the sulphate and chloride have maximum and minimum effect on decreasing nitrate removal by sugarcane bagasse vermicompost.

[Divband Hafshejani L, Naseri AA, Hooshmand AR, Abbasi F, Soltani Mohammadi A. Removal of nitrate ions from aqueous solution by modified sugarcane bagasse vermicompost. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):16-20]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 3.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.03

 

Keywords: Nitrate; optimum pH; phosphate; chloride

Full Text

3

4

Proteomics Applied To Plant Defense Mechanism: Role of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins in Disease Defense

 

Brian Gagosh Nayyar1*, Abida Akram1, Shaista Akhund1, Wajiha Seerat1, Sehrish Sadia2

 

1 Department of Botany, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi 46300, Pakistan

2 College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 10087, China

*Corresponding Author: brian_gagosh@hotmail.com

 

Abstract: The production of Pathogenesis–Related Proteins (PR-Proteins) in response to abiotic and biotic stresses is very clearly understood and is consider as a fundamental response for plant protection. Enormous PR-Proteins were identified and divided in to 17 functional families on the basis of their biological, structure and phylogenetic activities. PR-Proteins show numerous effects within the plant and possess antimicrobial activity, and can be considered as a part of defense system in plants. In present study, the structural and biochemical properties, as well as cell, tissue & organ localization, the induction and regulation of PR-Proteins were concisely outlined and critically commented. This review provides the finding that PR-Proteins share an evolution based origin and retain activity necessary for proper functioning and endurance of living entities in biotic or abiotic stresses. Cloning and characterization of the genes encoding PR-Proteins will be responsible for better understanding of their regulation and will raise their potential of biotechnological applications in disease resistance strategies.

[Brian Gagosh Nayyar, Abida Akram, Shaista Akhund, Wajiha Seerat, Sehrish Sadia. Proteomics Applied To Plant Defense Mechanism: Role of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins in Disease Defense. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):21-33]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 4.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.04

 

Key Words: Biotic Stress, PR-Proteins, Proteomics

Full Text

4

5

A Cross-sectional Study on Bovine Tuberculosis in Small Holder dairy farms of Guto Gidda District, East Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia

 

Haimanot Disassa1*, Mezene Woyessa2, Tadesse Birhanu2, Sultan Abda2, Fikadu Bekele3 Ketema Tefese4

 

1 Department of Animal Science, Assosa University, P.O.Box 18, Assosa, Ethiopia

2College of Medical and Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Wollega University, P.O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia

3Bedele Regional Laboratory

4College of Health Sciences, Arsi University, P.O. Box 193, Asella, Ethiopia

*Corresponding author: haimdis2012@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a contagious chronic and debilitating disease of cattle that can infect humans, other domestic animals and some wild life. The present study was aimed to estimate the prevalence of BTB and associated risk factors in small holder dairy farms of Guto Gida district in East Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design was carried out using comparative intradermal tuberculin test from January to September 2014, in small holder dairy farms Guto-Gida district to determine the prevalence of BTB. Purposive sampling technique was used. The current study showed that from a total of 295 cattle tested, 24 (8.14%) were found to be positive for BTB. Out of the total examined animals, 60 (20.3%) were males. The effects of different risk factors (like sex, age, breed type, and body condition score) for the occurrence of BTB were investigated. The difference in reactivity to the CIDT test among the study participants in different age groups was statistically significant (P-value = 0.027) showing higher risk of BTB in older animals when compared to the younger ones (OR=4.03, 95% CI, 1.17-13.85). This study revealed the significance of the disease in the study area. Farm owners and residents are usually in close contact with these animals and also consume raw milk regularly which predispose for high infection risks to them. Thus, further detailed epidemiological studies should be done to investigate the link between bovine and human tuberculosis in the study area in order to design appropriate strategic prevention and control measures.

[Haimanot Disassa, Mezene Woyessa, Tadesse Birhanu, Sultan Abda, Fikadu Bekele Ketema Tefese. A Cross-sectional Study on Bovine Tuberculosis in Small Holder dairy farms of Guto Gidda District, East Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):34-39]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 5.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.05

 

Keywords: Prevalence, Dairy Farms, Bovine tuberculosis, Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test, Guto Gida District

Full Text

5

6

Effect of different rates of spent mushroom substrate on the growth and yield of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis HOOK. F) in South – South, Nigeria

 

Orluchukwu, J. A., Mac-Aboh, A. R., and Omovbude, S

 

Department of Crop and Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, P. M. B. 5323 Choba Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

josephorluchukwu@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: An experiment was conducted during the wet season of 2015 at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, to evaluate the effect of different rates of spent mushroom substrates (SMS) of Pleurotus ostreatus (an edible fungus) as a bio fertilizer on the growth and yield of Telfairia occidentalis. The treatments consisted of four levels of spent mushroom substrate namely: 0 (control), 1,667kg/ha, 3333kg/ha, and 5,000kg/ha which were laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) and replicated three times. Data were collected on emergence count at 10 days after planting (DAP) and on vine length, number of leaves, leaf area and fresh shoot yield at 4, 6,8,10 and12 weeks after planting (WAP). Results of the study indicated that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) on emergence counts among the various rates of spent mushroom substrate (SMS). There were no significance differences among the various rates of SMS on number of leaves throughout the observation periods except at 6 WAP, where5,000kg/ha had the highest number (27) but statistically similar with that of 1,667kg/ha (24.667).The leaf area differed significantly (P<0.05) throughout the observation periods except at 4 WAP; at the maximum period (12 WAP) 5,000kg/ha had the highest leaf area (350.28cm2) while the control had the lowest (177.59cm2). Similar trend was also observed on vine length as that of leaf area. At 12 WAP, 5000kg /ha had the longest vine (326.80cm) and highest fresh shoot yield (6000kg/ha) while the control plot had the shortest vine (187.33cm) and lowest fresh shoot yield (3166.7kg/ha). Within the limit of this work it was observed that SMS at 5,000 kg/ha improves Telfairia occidentalis performance and is therefore recommended for Telfairia occidentalis production in the study area.

[Orluchukwu, J. A., Mac-Aboh, A. R., and Omovbude, S. Effect of different rates of spent mushroom substrate on the growth and yield of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis HOOK. F) in South – South, Nigeria. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):40-44]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 6.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.06

 

Key words: Spent mushroom substrate; Telfairia occidentalis; South-South, Growth and Yield

Full Text

6

7

Spatial Analysis of the Impacts of Community Conflicts on Socio-economy in Rivers State, Nigeria

 

Samuel Bankole Arokoyu and *Evangeline Nkiruka Ochulor

 

Department of Geography and Environmental Science Faculty of Social Science, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

angelicnkie01@yahoo.co.uk

 

Abstract: Community conflicts are global unbidden phenomena which pose serious challenges to rural development. There is dearth of information on the impacts of community conflict on the socio-economy and causes of the conflict especially in Rivers State. The present study therefore investigated and analyzed the impact of community conflicts on the socio-economic status of residents of Rivers State in conjunction with the causes of these community conflicts in Rivers State. A total of 2425 copies of questionnaire was distributed to elicit information from household population. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for the analysis. Findings revealed that more than 75% of respondent have witnessed community conflict in their respective communities at least three times while land ownership/boundary dispute (30.9%), chieftaincy title (24.8%) and compensation payment pattern (22.1%) were the predominant factors causing community conflicts in Rivers State. Loss of lives (27.3%) and maiming of people (18.1%) were the major effects of community conflict in Rivers State. More than 40% agreed on low attendance in schools during conflict while greatest effect of conflict on business was blockage of access to work/business (37.8%). Houses were mostly destroyed during community conflict partially (40.6%) and completely (67.7%). The recommended that that the socio-economy of people in the conflict-ridden communities in Rivers State should be improved.

[Arokoyu SB, Ochulor EN. Spatial Analysis of the Impacts of Community Conflicts on Socio-economy in Rivers State, Nigeria. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):45-52]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 7.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.07

 

Keywords: Community, Conflict, Socio-economy, Rivers State, Nigeria

Full Text

7

8

Foliar Application of Lithovit and Rose Water as Factor for Increasing Onion Seed Production

 

Abdelghafar1 M. S., M. T. Al-Abd1, A. A. Helaly1 and A.M. Rashwan2

 

1 Horticulture Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt

2 Horticulture Department, Faculty of Agriculture, South Vally University, Qena, Egypt

alaahelaly@hotmail.com

 

Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at a private farm in Sarawa, Ashmoun city, EL-Menofiya Governorate, Egypt during 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. The foliar application of lithovit levels at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 g/L and Rose water at level of 10, 20, 30 cm3/L on onion (Allium cepa L.) cv. Giza 20. Lithovit application with 0.5 g/L showed significant effect for most of studied characters such as earliness of bolting, bolting period, number of umbel scapes/plot, height of umbel scape, diameter of umbel, chlorophyll, carotenoids, seed yield /plot, Average weight of 100 seeds and seed germination %. Rose water application at 30 cm3/L gave the highest amount of seed yield /plot, average of weight 100 seeds and seed germination %.

[Abdelghafar M. S., M. T. Al-Abd, A. A. Helaly and A.M Rashwan. Foliar Application of Lithovit and Rose Water as Factor for Increasing Onion Seed Production. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):53-61]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 8.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.08

 

Keywords: Allium cepa L., Lithovit, Rose water, seed production, Giza 20

Full Text

8

9

A survey of home based rehabilitation model performance for movement disorders caused by neurological injuries

 

Amouzadeh Khalili M., Rasoulzadeh M., Mirshja F.

 

Neuromuscular Rehabilitation Research Center, Rehabilitation College, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran

moh35ir@yahoo.co.uk

 

Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of home based rehabilitation model performance for movement disorders caused by neurological injuries. Method: 24 volunteers with movement disorders caused by neurological injuries were included in the study. The participants randomly assigned in one of the two groups, the interventional and the control groups. Intervention program was carried out at home. The average ages of the two groups, interventional and control, were 5.8 and 6.3 years, respectively. Two measurements were applied to determine any alteration in patient improvement: Barthel index was used for measurement of ADL, and EQ-5D (euroqol) was used for quality of life. The assessments for the two groups were carried out twice (pre-tests and post-tests). Reassessments were carried out for the two groups at the end of week 5. Results: Comparison of pre- and post-treatment assessment results of Barthel index in the interventional group indicated a difference in terms of recovery, (P < 0.05). Comparison of pre- and post-treatment assessment results of quality of life in the interventional group indicated a difference in terms of recovery, (P < 0.05). The results of the two assessment methods: Barthel index and quality of life, revealed no significant differences between pre and posttests. Conclusion: The results of this study proved that home based rehabilitation model may enhance the function of the patients and improve the family quality of life.

[Amouzadeh Khalili M., Rasoulzadeh M., Mirshja F. A survey of home based rehabilitation model performance for movement disorders caused by neurological injuries. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):62-67]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 9.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.09

 

Keywords: Home based rehabilitation, movement disorders, Barthel index, and quality of life

Full Text

9

10

Prognostic Implication of Erg Gene Expression in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Normal Karyotyping

 

Amal El-Mahdy1, Mona El-Toukhy1, Howyda Moh. Kamal1, Doaa El-Ghannam2 and Heba Moh. mahmoud Shalaan3

 

1Clinical & Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Egypt.

2Clinical & chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt.

3M.B., B. Ch. Banha University, Egypt.

heba.shalaan@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Back ground: The aim of the present work is to assess prognostic significance of ERG gene expression in AML with normal cytogenetic. Subjects and Methods: Cases were selected for analysis on the basis of sample availability (peripheral blood, bone marrow sample and presence of cytogentic, also ERG gene expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: AML group was classified according to median ERG expression into high and low groups, median ERG expression was 1.575. The clinical outcome of AML patients in relation to ERG expression was that, all cases with low ERG expression achieved complete remission (CR) and all cases with refractory disease (RD) or induction deaths (ID) were in high expression group. Conclusion: High ERG expression is a bad prognostic factor for disease free survival (DFS) and overall (OS) in AML patients with normal cytogenetic.

[Amal El-Mahdy, Mona El-Toukhy, Howyda Moh. Kamal, Doaa El-Ghannam and Heba Moh. mahmoud Shalaan. Prognostic Implication of Erg Gene Expression in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Normal Karyotyping. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):68-74]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 10.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.10

 

Key words: C-N AML patients, High ERG expression, Real time PCR

Full Text

10

11

Climate Change and Sea Level Rise Impacts on Seawater Intrusion at Jefara Plain, Libya

 

A.M.S Gejam1 P. H.S. Riad1, M.A. Gad1, K.A. Rashed2 and N. A. Hasan1

 

1Irrigation and Hydraulic Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

2Civil Engineering Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Tripoli University, Tripoli, Libya

aa.baset@yahoo.com, aa.abdulbaset@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Almost of population in Libya are concentrated in north part at coastal areas, Jefara Plain located at north western of Libya. Jefara Plain influenced by Mediterranean Sea to the north in coastal areas and arid desert areas to the south near Jabal Nafusa. The main source of water in Libya is groundwater especially in Jefara Plain where 60% out of 6 million are living in the Plain. Current discharge is bigger than the recharge sources so the groundwater resources are not covering the rapid development in the plain. In this study the Numerical modeling was used as an effective tool for managing and predicting groundwater resources, MODFLOW and MT3DMS used to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport in Jefara Plain. Three suggested scenarios for years 1993 to 2040 have been applied in the model, the mentioned numerical model is based on the finite difference (FD), model (MODFLOW 2000) was used to simulate the flow system, and the solute transport model (MT3DMS) used to predict the transport of total dissolved solids. These scenarios include: first, pumping of agriculture assumed constant in this scenario, and the pumping of municipal are varied depending on population demand; second, this scenario studies the impact of sea level rise to seawater intrusion due to climate change without change in the recharge rates; and finally dealing with the extreme impacts of climate change by combining both the maximum rates of sea level rise (59 cm/100 yr.) and the minimum recharge rate (-10%). Results indicate that the third scenario has biggest effect on the drawdown and seawater intrusion extent. Different parameters including TDS, recharge, model boundary and advection parameters were adjusted to run the model. The third scenario caused a slight increase of TDS values over the values simulated by other scenarios.

[A.M.S. Gejam P. H. S. Riad, M.A. Gad, K. A. Rashed and N. A. Hassan. Climate Change and Sea Level Rise Impacts on Seawater Intrusion at Jefara Plain, Libya. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):75-81]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 11.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.11

 

Keywords: Jefara Plain, Groundwater, Modflow, MT3D, TDS, SWI, Abstractions

Full Text

11

12

Assessment of Road Junctions’ Noise Levels in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria Using Geographic Information Systems

 

*Samuel Bankole Arokoyu, Gladys Chineze Emenike, Livenus Tari Atasi

 

Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

samuel.arokoyu@uniport.edu.ng

 

Abstract: The study examined the spatio-temporal variation of traffic noise levels along major roads in Yenagoa City, Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Road junctions were sampled randomly for noise data using noise meters in the morning, afternoon and night. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used to test the significant difference in the spatio-temporal traffic noise levels. Spatial variability mapping of noise and noise risk zones were derived using inverse distance weight interpolation method. Findings showed that road junctions with higher noise level included Berger, Along Berger-Imgbi Junction, Swali Roundabout, Swali Market, Lambert Junction, Imgbi Junction, Ekeki, Okaka, Biogbolo, Opolo, Tombia Roundabout, Akenfa and Ede-Epie while the lower noise level was found in Oxbow Lake Junction, Oxbow Lake, Berger Bayelsa Palm Road, Bayelsa Palm and Lambert Eradiri Roundabout. Findings also showed that 33.3% of the road junctions were tolerable and 33.3% were lowly risked to noise pollution while only 6.1% was moderately risk. Moreover, noise level was highest on Wednesdays and the least was observed in Saturday. Findings also revealed that the mean traffic noise level in the morning was 66.9 dB (A), afternoon 69.9 dB (A) while in the night was 66.1 dB (A). The overall traffic noise risk levels revealed that 20.9% of Yenagoa City were safe, 39.4% were tolerable, 34.4% were lowly risked while 5.3% were moderately risked. Okaki, Oxbow Lake, Bayelsa Palm, and Agudama-Epie were safe, Prosco, INEC, Akenpai, Nikton and Igbogene were tolerable, Akenfa, Berger, Swali Roundabout and Swali Market were lowly risked while Tombia Roundabout, Ede-Epie, Opolo, and Biogbolo were moderately risked. There was a significant difference in the spatial (F0.05 =11.415, p<0.05) and temporal traffic (F0.05 =7.823, p<0.05) noise levels in Yenagoa City. The study recommended that people residing or working in the moderately noise risked zones should use ear-protection aids to reduce the effects of noise in their health systems.

[Arokoyu SB., Emenike GC., Atasi L.T. Assessment of Road Junctions’ Noise Levels in Yenagoa Metropolis, Nigeria Using Geographic Information Systems. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):82-96]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 12.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.12

 

Keywords: Traffic noise, Risk zones, Spatio-temporal, Road junctions, Yenagoa

Full Text

12

13

Mathematical model for irrigation water management to improve the Bottle Gourd Production

 

A. K. Mahmoud 1 and Rewaa. S. El shatoury2

 

1 Department of Chemical and Soil physics - Desert Research Center (DRC), Cairo, EGYPT

2Department of Horticulture-Faculty of Agricultural- Suez Canal University, Ismalia, EGYPT

Amr_73@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: This study was carried out at Faculty of Agricultural- Suez Canal University which located in north eastern Egypt, within the Governorate of Ismailia. The experiment was conducted to assess the influence of different amounts of water and plant distance on Bottle Gourd production. Thus; the factor of water amounts comprise into three treatments (Q1, Q2 and Q3) with average (352.4, 704.8 and 1409.6 mm) respectively under different plant distances (0.5m and0.75m).Thus; the results revealed that the highest values for (LAI) have recorded with distance S2 comparing with S1 whatever the amounts of water. Obviously; that the LAI values have a good behavior with S2 and Q2 by (5.1m2.m-2). On the other hand; the (LAI) needs to approximately 1556.72, 831.5 and 929.26 heat units to increase (1m2.m-2) under treatments Q1, Q2 and Q3 respectively with S1. However with S2; (LAI) needs for low heat units by 394.4, 304.2 and 449.09 heat units under Q1,Q2 and Q3 respectively to get (1m2.m-2). Generally; LAI needs for low heat units to increase with Q2 comparing with other quantities whatever changing on plant distance. Furthermore; In addition; there is a significant influence for S1 comparing with S2 on yield production where S1 obtained 5.8(ton.fed-1) and S2 obtained 4.1 (ton.fed-1). However; with treatment Q1 recorded a highest value for IWUE by (3.5 Kg/m3). Further; the highest value for Heat use efficiency (HUE) obtained under Q3 with S1 by (4.3 Kg. fed -1 C-1day-1). Thus; from previous data analysis that best treatment is Q1 (low amount of water) which gain a good value both (IWUE).

[A.K.Mahmoud and Rewaa. S.El shatoury. Mathematical model for irrigation water management to improve the Bottle Gourd Production. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):97-104]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 13.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.13

 

Key words: water quantities, plant distance, Heat use efficiency and Bottle Gourd production.

Full Text

13

14

Bleeding Evaluation of Uterine Straightening by Bladder Distention as Anew Modality in Office Hysteroscopy

 

Walaa M. ElBasuone 1, Mahmoud F.Midan 1, Mahmoud S. Rade 1, ALsaid Elsayed A. Asker 1

 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Al-Azhar Faculty of Medicine, Egypt.

walaa_abuzaid@hotmail.com

 

Abstract: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is one of the most common presenting complaints encountered in a Gynecologist's office and accounts for almost 10% consultations in any busy outpatient clinic. AUB is defined as ‘bleeding that is excessive or occurs outside of normal cyclic menstruation’ and accounts for two-thirds of hysterectomies. Office hysteroscopy (OH) is a common gynecologic procedure, mainly used to detect uterine pathologies, that requires the cervix to be dilated. Complications such as uterine perforation, cervical laceration, failure to dilate, and creation of a false track can occur during cervical entry (Bastu et al., 2013). The indications for hysteroscopic procedures in gynecologic practice are ample and clearly charted: hysteroscopy is considered the gold standard not only for visualizing the cervical canal and the uterine cavity, but also for treating many different kinds of benign pathologies localized to that region (Soguktas et al., 2012). Our objective: was to evaluate the effect of uterine straightening by bladder distention for minimizing time, pain and easy cervical entry during office hysteroscopy Conclusion: Bladder distension seems to be an effective method for decreasing the duration and making ease of cervical entry during office hysteroscopic procedure. Bladder distension doesn’t have a significant effect on pain score or patient acceptability. The effect of bladder distension was prominent among multiparous women, while there was no evidence of such effects in relation to the age of the patient and the indication of hysteroscopy.

[Walaa M. ElBasuone, Mahmoud F. Midan, Mahmoud S. Rade, ALsaid Elsayed A. Asker. Bleeding Evaluation of Uterine Straightening by Bladder Distention as Anew Modality in Office Hysteroscopy. Nat Sci 2016;14(3):105-111]. ISSN 1545-0740 (print); ISSN 2375-7167 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 14.

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.14

 

Keywords: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), three dimensional ultrasound, endometrial hyperplasia, hysteroscopy endometrial polyp and sub mucous myoma

Full Text

14

The manuscripts in this issue are presented as online first for peer-review starting from February 24, 2016.

 All comments are welcome: editor@sciencepub.net

For back issues of the Nature and Science, click here.

Emails: editor@sciencepub.net; sciencepub@gmail.com; naturesciencej@gmail.com

 Marsland Press, PO Box 180432, Richmond Hill, New York 11418, USA. 347-321-7172; http://www.sciencepub.net

 

 doi:

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.01

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.02

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.03

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.04

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.05

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.06

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.07

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.08

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.09

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.10

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.11

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.12

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.13

doi:10.7537/marsnsj140316.14

 

 

 

2016 Marsland Press

Terms of Service  |  Privacy Policy  |

2016 Marsland Press