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Biomedicine and Nursing
ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online); doi:10.7537/marsbnj; Quarterly
Volume 3 - Issue 2 (Cumulated No. 9), 25, 2017. 
Cover (jpg), Cover (pdf), Introduction, Contents, Call for Papers 

 

The following manuscripts are presented as online first for peer-review, starting from March 30, 2017. 

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CONTENTS  

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Major Health and Welfare Problems of Camels in Dire Dawa Administration Council, Eastern Ethiopia

 

Jabir Teha1, Lishan Asefa1, Tadesse Birhanu1, 2* and Ayele Gizachew1

 

1School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, P.O. Box:395, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

2 Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Salale University, P.O. Box: 245, Fitche, Ethiopia

*Corresponding author: drbirhan@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: A cross sectional study was conducted from October, 2014 to April, 2015at selected districts of Dire Dawa administrative council, eastern Ethiopia to determine the major health and welfare problems of camel. Among 393 inspected camels, 38.4% were suffering from major health problems like enteritis (albatii) (23.9%), Cephalopina titillator larvae (Digir) (23.9%), camel contagious ecthzeyma (Afcarro) (13.2%), pneumonia (Qufa) (9.10%) and dermatophilosis (Citto) (8.90%). The study also indicated that overloading (33%), lack of feed and water (15%) and poor attitude (12%) were the main welfare problems in the study area. There was also an association between sex and working activities, a higher proportion of males (79.0%) were engaged in loading than females (27.0%)which was statistically significant (p=0.00). The informants of this study were indicated parasites, pneumonia and enteritis were the major health problems whereas overworking, malnutrition and poor attention were the major problems in study area. Thus, strategic community education should be done in order to improve management system of the camel.

[Jabir Teha, Lishan Asefa, Tadesse Birhanu and Ayele Gizachew. Major Health and Welfare Problems of Camels in Dire Dawa Administration Council, Eastern Ethiopia. Biomedicine and Nursing 2017;3(2): 1-5]. ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online). http://www.nbmedicine.org. 1. doi:10.7537/marsbnj030217.01.

 

Key words: Camel, Dire Dawa Town, Group Discussion, Health Problem, Welfare Problem

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Prevalence of Bovine flukes in Irrigation Canals of Amibara District, Afar Region, North-East Ethiopia

 

Tsegaye Bertualem2, Tesfaye Kassa1 and Tadesse Birhanu1, 3*

 

1Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O.Box: 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

2School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, P.O. Box:395, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

3Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, Salale University, P.O. Box: 245, Fitche, Ethiopia

*Corresponding author: drbirhan@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: A cross-sectional study was carried out from November to April, 2016 in irrigation canals of Amibara District of Afar Region, Ethiopia with the aim of determining the prevalence of major bovine flukes. Simple random sampling was used to select both the study animals and Peasant Associations. Coprological examination using sedimentation technique was applied for the recovery of the flukes’ eggs from freshly collected fecal samples. The collected data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS 21 version software. Out of the total 400 fecal samples examined, 183 (45.8%) were infected with bovine flukes infection. The prevalence of Paramphistoma, Fasciola and Schistosoma bovis was 15.3%, 9.5% and 7.3%, respectively in the study area. The result indicated that the prevalence of the flukes was higher in females (46.3%) than males (42.4%). It was also slightly higher in young (< 2 years) cattle (46.4%) than adult ones (>2 years) (43.9%). Among the associated risk factors, the highest prevalence of infection with flukes was observed poor body condition animals (63.4%) and statistical significant difference was observed with the occurrence of flukes infection (p<0.05). There were mixed infection: Fasciolosis and Paraphistomosis, 31 (7.75%); Paraphistomosis and Schistosomiasis, 7 (1.75%); Fasciolosis and Schistosomiasis, 11 (2.75%) and Fasciolosis, Paraphistomosis and Schistosomiasis, 6 (1.50%) in study area. This study indicated that bovine flukes are the major cattle parasites in the study area. Thus, awareness creation should be done for the livestock owners about intermediate host (snail) and strategic deworming in order to reduce pasture contamination. Moreover; further study on snail dynamics and infection rates should be conducted so as to design effective prevention and control strategies.

[Tsegaye Bertualem, Tesfaye Kassa and Tadesse Birhanu. Prevalence of Bovine flukes in Irrigation Canals of Amibara District, Afar Region, North-East Ethiopia. Biomedicine and Nursing 2017;3(2): 6-11]. ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online). http://www.nbmedicine.org. 2. doi:10.7537/marsbnj030217.02.

 

Keyword: Amibara, Bovine, Coprology, Ethiopia, Flukes, Sedimentation Test

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Review On Bovine Hydatidosis

 

Geda Shendo1, Birhanu Ayele2, Mengestie Abebaw1 and Genene Girma1

 

1 Faculity of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical and Health science, University of Gondar, P.O. Box. 196, Gondar, Ethiopia, 2 Lecturer at University of Gondar, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Paraclinical studies, Faculty of Vet Medicine, University of Gondar, P.O. Box. 196, Gondar, Ethiopia, manabebaw@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Echinococcosis (Hydatidosis) is a zoonotic disease caused by the larval stage (hydatid cyst) of E. granulosus. The disease spread when food or water that contains infective stage of the parasite is eaten or by close contact with infected animal. Bovine Echinococcosis is worldwide in its distribution with only few areas supposed to be free of the disease. Dogs are the primary definitive hosts for this parasite, while livestock and human beings acting as intermediate hosts. The disease poses significant threat in human health and livestock economy. The public health significances lies on the cost of hospitalization, medical and surgical fees, loss of income and productivity, permanent or temporary incapacity to work. In food animals, Echinococcosis causes decreased production of meat, milk, and wool, reduction in growth rate, and predisposition to other diseases. Targeting the major risk factors for the disease and the way it is transmitted, interrupting the life cycle, destroying the reservoir host and improved water sanitation is the most effective way in controlling and prevention of the disease.

[Geda Shendo, Birhanu Ayele, Mengestie Abebaw and Genene Girma. Review On Bovine Hydatidosis. Biomedicine and Nursing 2017;3(2): 12-23]. ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online). http://www.nbmedicine.org. 3. doi:10.7537/marsbnj030217.03.

 

Key words; Cattle, Economic importance, Hydatidosis

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Human Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Biomarker in Patients with Acute Chest Pain

 

El-Saeid, M. E. El-Bawab, Mohammad Mohammad Abolfotoh, Abdelzaher M.H*, Hussein M. Eldeeb and Sayed Fathy Ali

 

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Assuit, Egypt

abdelzaher_gerga@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Human Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein (H-FABP), a small (15kDa) cytoplasmic tissue specific protein, is mainly expressed by myocytes. Aim: The aim of this work is to compare between (H-FABP) as a sensitive biomarker than other traditional biomarkers for early differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. Methods: This study was carried out on 60 subjects and classified into four groups; Control group, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), unstable angina (UA) and Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP). We assessed serum levels of LDH, Tropinin-I, CK-MB, H-FABP and Myoglobin. Results: We found that Serum H-FABP was significantly higher in AMI and UA in comparison with control and NCCP groups (P<0.05). Serum H-FABP differentiated between AMI group & UA group at cut off 22.35 ng/ml with sensitivity 85%, specificity 70 %, and over all accuracy 81.2%. Serum H-FABP differentiated between AMI group cases of 0 – 3 hours, as it has the highest sensitivity of the studied cardiac markers. Conclusion: This study showed that Measurement of serum H-FABP can be used in early differential diagnosis of acute chest pain patients.

[El-Saeid, M. E. El-Bawab, Mohammad Mohammad Abolfotoh, Abdelzaher M.H*, Hussein M. Eldeeb and Sayed Fathy Ali. Human Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Biomarker in Patients with Acute Chest Pain. Biomedicine and Nursing 2017;3(2): 24-30]. ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online). http://www.nbmedicine.org. 4. doi:10.7537/marsbnj030217.04.

 

Keywords: Heart Type-Fatty Acid Binding Protein (H-FABP), acute chest pain, Myocardial infarction, cardiac Biomarkers.

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Traditional Medicinal plants used in Ethiopia for Animal diseases treatment

 

Abebe Mequanent 1, Getinet Ayalew 2, Habtamu Addis 1

 

1 University of Gondar College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, Gondar, Ethiopia, P.o. Box: 196

2University of Gondar, college of computational and natural science, department of biotechnology

E-mail: abebemequanent@gmil.com

 

Summary: Traditional medicines have been used for nearly 90% of livestock populations in Ethiopia where complimentary remedies are required to the modern health care system. All plants with pharmacological activity complimentarily prescribed as best choice against livestock diseases. Availability of veterinary services is a major constraint in the arid areas of Ethiopia. The government resources to run veterinary practices do not meet the rising costs of within the veterinary sector. An increasing number of pastoralists are turning to Ethnoveterinary medicine. Ethnoveterinary practices concern to animal healthcare is as old as the domestication of various livestock species. They comprise belief, knowledge, practices and skills pertaining to healthcare and management of livestock. Substances or medicinal plants used for Ethnoveterinary treatments include, Whistling thorn (Grar), White albizia (Bisna), Garlic (nech shinkurt), Aloe (Iret), Desert date (Goza), Hot pepper (Berbere), Papaya (Papaya), Carissa (Agam), Velvet-leaved combretum (Avalo), Broad-leaved croton (Bisana), Devils’s trumpet (At’efaris), Lemon-scented gum (Shito-barzaf), Tree euphorbia (K’ulk’wal), Lantana (Yemichi-medihanit/ Kese), Microglossa (Nech’i-weyinagift), Tobacco plant (Timbaho), Sodom apple (Imbway), Ginger (Jinjibil) and Tree vernonia (Grawa) were used.

[Abebe M, Getinet A, Habtamu A. Traditional Medicinal plants used in Ethiopia for Animal diseases treatment. Biomedicine and Nursing 2017;3(2): 31-41]. ISSN 2379-8211 (print); ISSN 2379-8203 (online). http://www.nbmedicine.org. 5. doi:10.7537/marsbnj030217.05.

 

Key words: Medicine, Ethnoveterinary medicine, medicinal plants.

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The following manuscripts are presented as online first for peer-review, starting from , 2017. 

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