Science Journal

 

Researcher
(Researcher)
ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online), doi prefix:10.7537, Monthly
Volume 9 - Issue 11 (Cumulated No. 101), November 25, 2017
Cover (jpg), Cover (pdf), Introduction, Contents, Call for Papers, Researcher0911
 

You can use the message in end of the article abstract to cite it.

To get Microsoft Documents: After you open the "Full Text" for each article, change the last 3 characters of the web address from .pdf to .doc (or .docx)

Welcome to send your manuscript to: sciencepub@gmail.com

When you manuscript(s), please mention that it is submitted to Researcher

Marsland Press, PO Box 180432, Richmond Hill, New York 11418, USA, 347-321-7172

http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher

 

CONTENTS  

No.

Titles / Authors /Abstracts

Full Text

No.

1

Functions of “Bepari/Local Paddy Assembler” in the Paddy/Rice Marketing System of Bangladesh -A case study of Brahmanbaria District-

 

Maya Sultana, Junayed Uddin Ahmed, Yoshiharu Shiratake

 

[1]The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima Shi, Japan

2 Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University, Saga Shi Japan

3 Professor, Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University, Saga Shi Japan

junayeda@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Agriculture is the largest producing sector of Bangladesh economy since 80% people are directly or indirectly attached in this sector. Marketing of paddy is playing a significant role in shaping the total economy. Large amount of paddy/rice distributed all over Bangladesh through a very complex distribution channel. Different types and large number of paddy/rice traders are involved in the marketing system such as Bepari/Local Paddy Assembler (LPA), Paddy Aratdar/Local Paddy Broker (LPB), Paddy Aratdar-cum wholesaler/Paddy wholesaler (PW) and Rice Miller (RM), Rice Aratdar/Local Rice Broker, Wholesaler and Retailer. Among these traders, “Bepari/LPA” is the main selling destination for farmers as 64.3% of paddy distributed through them. “Bepari/LPA” performs important functions and they have much influential power over paddy farmers for their ability. Farmers usually do not get a fair profit or benefits for lack of facility and equipment. In that regards, if farmers can accumulate facility more, they can negotiate strongly to obtain right price of paddy with Bepari/LPA. If farmers cannot arrange the capital to build up the facility, then they need to organize a farmer’s co-operative society. In addition to, the central government have to introduce a rice wholesale market and wholesale market law to set right price of paddy.

[Maya Sultana, Junayed Uddin Ahmed, Yoshiharu Shiratake. Functions of “Bepari/Local Paddy Assembler” in the Paddy/Rice Marketing System of Bangladesh -A case study of Brahmanbaria District-. Researcher 2017;9(11):1-8]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 1. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.01.

 

Key words: Bepari / Local Paddy Assembler, Rice Marketing System, Facility of farmers, Bangladesh.

Full Text

1

2

Prevalance And Generic Identification Of Ectoparasites On Small Ruminants In Yirgachefe District, Central Southern Ethiopia

 

1Dawit Yitbarek, 2Hailehizeb Cheru, and 3Belsity Shumet, and 4Bewuketu Anteneh

 

1Sinor clinical expert at Bahir Dar Veterinary clinic, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. 2Lecturer at burie poly technic college department of animal health P.o.box. 75, Burie, Ethiopia, 3 Sinor clinical expert at Kuy Veterinary clinic, Kuy, Ethiopia. 4Sinor clinical expert at Lumame Veterinary clinic, Lumame, Ethiopia.

haile12cheru12@gmail.com; Telephone: +251921165854

 

Abstract: A cross sectional study was conducted from November, 2014 to March, 2015 in Yirgachefe district to determine the prevalence and generic identifications of ectoparasites on small ruminants. A total of 384 small ruminants, sheep (n=302) and goats (n=82) were sampled animals in the study. The overall ectoparasite prevalence showed that 240 (62.5%) small ruminants were infested by single or mixed ectoparasites. Accordingly, a total of 187 (61.9 %) of sheep and 53 (64.6%) of goats were found infested with ectoparasites. The most common ectoparasite encountered in order of their predominance in sheep were tick (30.8%), lice (23.2), flea (20.9%) and sheep ked (1.0%). where as in goats 31.7% tick, 21.9% flea and 14.6% lice were identified during the study. Among the risk factors, body condition score was found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of ectoparasites in the study area. The prevalence of ectoparasites infestation was significantly higher in small ruminants of poor body condition than with good body condition score. No statistical significant association (P>0.05) was found between the species of small ruminants and ectoparasites infestations. The infestation rates of ectoparasites were not statistically different between sex and age in the whole population of small ruminants. Nevertheless, the analysis showed as if there was statistically significant difference (P<0.05%) in the prevalence of tick with age of small ruminants and it was relatively higher in adult (34.7%) than young (22.7%). Therefore, the higher prevalence of ectoparasites in small ruminants from result of the present study showed that, appropriate and strategic control measure of ectoparasites is needed to reduce high prevalence of ectoparasites and their impacts on the production and productivity of small ruminants in the study area..

[Dawit Y, Hailehizeb C, Belisty S, Bewuket A. Prevalance And Generic Identification Of Ectoparasites On Small Ruminants In Yirgachefe District, Central Southern Ethiopia. Researcher 2017;9(11):9-16]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 2. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.02.

 

Key words: Ectoparasites, Goats, Prevalence, Sheep, Small ruminants

Full Text

2

3

Response of Some Onion Genotypes to Mineral, Organic and Biofertilizers

 

El-Hawary, M.A.1, E.M.A. Abd El-Kader1, A.M.A. Abo -Dahab2, H.M. Allam2

 

1Agronomy Department, Faculty of Agriclture, Al-Azhar University, Egypt

2Onion Research Department, Field Crop Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Giza, Egypt

hasanallam027@gmail.com

 

Abstract: This study was carried out at Gemmeiza Agriculture Research Station Farm, Agriculture Research Center, Gharbeia Governorate, in 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 seasons to study response of some onion genotypes to mineral, organic and biofertilizers on vegetative growth, yield and its components. The obtained results showed that there were significant differences among onion genotypes of all studied characters in both seasons. Composite 16 Oblong genotype gave the highest number of leaves/plant at 90 days from transplanting, bulbing ratio at 90 and 120 days from transplanting, bulb weight, marketable and total yield as compared with other onion genotypes tested in both seasons. The obtained results indicated that fertilization treatments had the significant effects on all studied traits in both seasons. Application of 5 ton compost + 67.5 kg N/feddan (75% of recommended) surpassed other studied fertilization treatments and resulted in the highest values of number of leaves/plant at 90 days, bulbing ratio at 90 and 120 days from transplanting, bulb weight (g), culls yield (t/fed), marketable yield (t/fed) and total yield (t/fed) in both seasons. The interaction between onion genotypes and fertilization treatments significantly affected number of leaves/plant at 90 days, bulbing ratio at 90 and 120 days from transplanting, bulb weight, marketable and total yield in both seasons. Fertilized onion plant Composite 16 Oblong genotype with 5 ton compost + 67.5 kg N/feddan gave the highest values of number of leaves/plant at 90 days, bulbing ratio at 90 and 120 days from transplanting, bulb weight (g), culls yield (t/fed), marketable yield (t/fed) and total yield (t/fed) as compared with all other treatments in both seasons.

[El-Hawary, M.A., E.M.A. Abd El-Kader, A.M.A. Abo -Dahab, H.M. Allam. Response of Some Onion Genotypes to Mineral, Organic and Biofertilizers. Researcher 2017;9(11):17-26]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 3. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.03.

 

Keywords: Response; Onion; Genotype; Mineral; Organic; Biofertilizers

Full Text

3

4

Optimal allocation of water resources to increase water use efficiency using genetic algorithm (case study: Hamidiya irrigation network)

 

P. Kashefi Nezhad1, A. Hooshmand2, S. Boroomand Nasab3

 

1M. Sc. Student of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Peymankashefi17@yahoo.com

2Associate professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Hooshmand_a@scu.ac.ir

3Professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Boroomandsaeed@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: A model was created to optimally allocate irrigation water in order to increase water use efficiency using genetic algorithm (GA). Results indicated that relative water use efficiency is increased by 3%, however, total cultivated area is increased by 2709.6 hectares and net benefit is also increased by 139.1 billion Rials, while the consumed water under optimal irrigation water allocation is equal to the current irrigation water consumption situation. Furthermore, a model was created to minimize yield estimation by modifying the crops Kyi values under deficit irrigation situation using GA in order to minimize yield reduction estimation under deficit irrigation. Results indicated that the Yield reduction values of the Kyi are less than those which was proposed by former studies, so the modified values are recommended to be used in estimating yield reduction under deficit irrigation situation.

[P. Kashefi Nezhad, A. Hooshmand, S. Boroomand Nasab. Optimal allocation of water resources to increase water use efficiency using genetic algorithm (case study: Hamidiya irrigation network). Researcher 2017;9(11):27-35]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 4. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.04.

 

Keywords: Optimal allocation; water resource; genetic algorithm; case study; Hamidiya irrigation; network

Full Text

4

5

Forward and inverse kinematics for the 2-link manipulator (Two-Dimensional Kinematics)

 

Jaesung Oh 1, Yoonsung Joshua Ryu 2, Christi Kim 3, Yeji Cho 4

 

1 PhD Candidate, Hubo Lab, KAIST Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul South Korea

2 Yongsan International School of Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

3 The Bronx High School of Science, Bronx NY

4 Hunter College Campus School, New York, NY

yejicho3800@gmail.com

 

Abstract: The simplest of all the robots that can perform tasks in 2D kinematics is the 2-link manipulator, which has two-joint axles. One method of expressing the position of the 2-link manipulator is in joint space, which expresses the position of each joint. The other method uses coordinate data in Cartesian space (X, Y). In forward kinematics, data can be collected in the Cartesian space by using joint space; in inverse kinematics, the reverse is true.

[Jaesung Oh, Yoonsung Joshua Ryu, Christi Kim, Yeji Cho . Forward and inverse kinematics for the 2-link manipulator (Two-Dimensional Kinematics). Researcher 2017;9(11):36-39]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 5. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.05.

 

Keywords: robots: kinematics; manipulator

Full Text

5

6

Methodological Typology of Interferences in Professionally-oriented Teaching Economic Vocabulary at ESP Classes

 

Irina Panferova

 

Department of Theory and Methods of Teaching English, Tashkent State Pedagogical University, Tashkent 100185, Uzbekistan

teacheriren@mail.ru

 

Abstract: The main purpose of this article is to consider language material selection and methodological typology of interferences and peculiarities that must be taken into account while teaching the lexical aspect of economic English. Therefore, this goal determines the following main objectives, disclosed in this section of our research work: consideration of typology, specifics, functions of economic vocabulary in formation of lexical skills and organization of economic discourse in ESP teaching process. Thus, having analyzed the existing approaches to teaching professional vocabulary, we considered the implementation of the operational approach to acquisition of economic terms by using analytical-synthetic operations in receptive activity and synthetic-combinatorial operations for reproductive acquisition. As a result, in the framework of this article we modified the principles of teaching professional vocabulary, presented a recommended sequence for preparing ESP materials, distinguished separately typology of potential words of lexical resource and singled out the most significant types of term difficulties in the active vocabulary.

[Panferova I. Methodological Typology of Interferences in Professionally-oriented Teaching Economic Vocabulary at ESP Classes. Researcher 2017;9(11):40-46]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 6. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.06.

 

Key words: Teaching ESP, operational approach, economic terms, material selection, typology of interferences, receptive and reproductive activity.

Full Text

6

7

Problems On Veterinary Vaccine And Its Solution Western Hararghe

 

Umer Seid 1, Mohammed Ahmed 2

 

1   Department of Animal Science, Oda Bultum University, Umer Seid, Chiro, Ethiopia

2   Chiro woreda, Animal health worker, Mohammed Ahmed, Chiro, Ethiopia

+251913765578; omerseid76@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Livestock production constitutes one of the principal means of achieving and improving living standards in many regions of the agricultural productive system in Ethiopia. As in many other countries, livestock plays multiple roles in Ethiopia being a major natural source of food, industrial raw materials, export earnings and form an integral part of agriculture production system. Cattle production in Ethiopia, as well as in Western Hararghe zone, however, is constrained by a number of factors including malnutrition, disease, improper health care and other management problems. Among the serious constrains to livestock production in West Hararghe zone is the high prevalence of various disease, mainly of bacterial, viral, protozoal, fungal and parasitic origin. The least cost method to restore health and productivity in perspectives of disease should focus to preventive medicine. In Western Hararghe zone context good managements and vaccination is the priority. But veterinary vaccinations there is so many problems, such as shortage of knowledge about the vaccines how to store, transport and how to vaccinate the animals. The absence of trained person on handling vaccines or importance of good vaccine storage and transportation techniques. We store vaccine in the refrigerator normally but when the electric power is cut off there is no any action taken to solve the problems (there is no backup system) especially on woreda. Vaccine which purchased expensively does not used properly. This causes economic impacts on farmers who vaccinate their animals and impacts on government budget. To solve this problem the training should have to be giving to all concerned body and fulfill material that used for storage and transporting of vaccine.

[Seid U, Ahmed M. Problems On Veterinary Vaccine And Its Solution Western Hararghe. Researcher 2017;9(11):47-56]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 7. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.07.

 

Key word: livestock, Vaccine, Disease, Hararghe.

Full Text

7

8

The effect of magnetic salt water on some physical properties of soil in drip irrigation under sunflower plant

 

Z. Rahimi1, S. Boroomand Nasab 2, A. Hooshmand 3

 

1M. Sc. Student of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Rahimimz139@yahoo.com

2 professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Boroomand@scu.ac.ir

3 Associate Professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. hooshmand_a@scu.ac.ir

 

Abstract: In order to study the effect of magnetic salt water on some physical parameters of soil in drip irrigation under sunflower cultivation, six treatments including irrigation water treatment (W factor), magnetic water and non-magnetic water were the main factors, and three levels of salinity (Factor S) included Karoon River water, saline water 4 and salinity water 6 ds / m as a sub-factor. The experimental design was factorial in a completely randomized block with three replications. The research was carried out at the Faculty of Water Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahwaz, Iran. The results showed that saline water had no significant effect on porosity, bulk density and soil moisture content (field capacity).

[Z. Rahimi, S. Boroomand Nasab, A. Hooshmand. The effect of magnetic salt water on some physical properties of soil in drip irrigation under sunflower plant. Researcher 2017;9(11):57-59]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 8. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.08.

 

Keywords: Magnetic water, Salty water, Trickle Irrigation

Full Text

8

9

Heavy Metal on Fish

 

Mona S. Zaki1, Nabila El-Batraway 2and Samy Shalaby3

 

1Department of Hydrobiology, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt

2Animal Reproduction Institute Al Haram, Egypt

3Deptartment of Animal Reproduction, National Research Center, Cairo, Egypt

dr_mona_zaki@yahoo.co.uk

 

Abstract: In general, metals can be categorized as biologically essential and non-essential. The nonessential metals (e.g., aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), tin (Sn) and lead (Pb)) have no proven biological function (also called xenobiotics or foreign elements), and their toxicity rises with increasing concentrations. Essential metals (e.g., copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo) and iron (Fe)) on the other hand, have a known important biological roles.

[Mona S. Zaki, Nabila El-Batraway and Samy Shalaby. Heavy Metal on Fish. Researcher 2017;9(11):60-64]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 9. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.09.

 

Keywords: Heavy Metal; Fish; biologically essential and non-essential

Full Text

9

10

Economic Growth and Sustainable Development in Himalayan State Uttarakhand of India

 

Dr. P.D. Singh1, Dr. Sunita Gusain2, Prof. R.R.Nautiya3

 

1Faculty at Department of Economics, H.N.B.Garhwal University, Srinagar Garhwal Uttarakhand, pawanmanhas1@india.com.

2Faculty at Department of Economics, Govt. P.G. College, Kotdwar, Uttarakhand. Sunita30gusain@gmail.com

3Prof. (Retd.) Department of Economics, H.N.B.Garhwal University, Srinagar Garhwal Uttarakhand rrnautiyal@yahoo.in.

 

Abstract: Sustainability has appeared more frequently over the past several decades in literature in all fields, particularly those concerned with environment and halting environmental degradation (e.g. Senator Al Gore’s 1991 Earth in the balance). Sustainable development is a constantly evolving concept. Thus the will to improve everyone’s quality of life, including that of future generations, by reconciling economic growth, social development and environmental protection sustainable development becomes very important. The present piece of work is an attempt to explore the concept of sustainable development & highlights the importance of sustainable development in Uttarakhand and suggests some important measures to improve sustainability. The relation between economic growth and sustainable development is also presented in this paper.

[P.D. Singh, Sunita Gusain, R.R. Nautiyal . Economic Growth and Sustainable Development in Himalayan State Uttarakhand of India. Researcher 2017;9(11):65-72]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 10. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.10.

 

Keywords: Sustainable development, Economic growth, Environmental degradation, Social development

Full Text

10

11

Optimization of irrigation water allocation to reach the maximum net benefit using Genetic algorithm (Case Study: Hamidiya irrigation network)

 

P. Kashefi Nezhad1, A. Hooshmand2, S. Boroomand Nasab3

 

1M. Sc. Student of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Peymankashefi17@yahoo.com

2Associate professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Hooshmand_a@scu.ac.ir

3Professor of Irrigation and Drainage, Faculty of Water Science Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. Boroomandsaeed@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Two optimization models were created in this study. The first one is to minimize the error in yield reduction estimation under deficit irrigation situation, and the second one is to maximize total net benefit in Hamidiya irrigation network. Results from yield estimation error minimization model indicates that the yield reduction is 112.5% for beans, 195.5% for rice, 102.5% for canola and sesame, 135% for tomato, 105% for cucumber, and 170% percent for vegetables under applying 50% deficit irrigation in all growth stages using the Kyi values proposed by former studies, while yield reduction is 57.5% for beans, 54.9% for rice, 40% for canola and sesame, 54.8% for tomato, 46.8% for cucumber, and 49.7% for vegetables under applying 50% deficit irrigation in all growth stages using the modified Kyi values proposed by this study. Results from the optimal allocation of irrigation water model indicates that the consumed water is reduced by 12%, while the total cultivation area and total net benefit is increased by 17.3% and 25%, respectively. As a result, genetic algorithm has proved to be an effective tool in the models created in this study.

[P. Kashefi Nezhad, A. Hooshmand, S. Boroomand Nasab. Optimization of irrigation water allocation to reach the maximum net benefit using Genetic algorithm (Case Study: Hamidiya irrigation network). Researcher 2017;9(11):73-81]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 11. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.11.

 

Keywords: Genetic algorithm; Yield reduction; Deficit irrigation; water management; Cultivation area

Full Text

11

12

Assessment of Major Reproductive Health Disorders of Dairy Cattle in and around Nekemte town, East Wollega Zone, Ethiopia

Misgana Duguma1, Gebeyehu Goshu 2

1 Wollega University, School of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia (Email:
2 Addis Ababa Universities, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, P.O. Box 34, Bishoftu, Ethiopia
misganadu2007@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Reproductive health disorder is one of the limiting factors to the production of dairy animals. A longitudinal and retrospective study was conducted from December 2014 to March 2015 with the objectives to identify major reproductive health disorders of dairy cows in smallholder dairy farms in and around Nekemte town. All dairy farms in Nekemte town willing for the follow up study were included. All the dairy farm owners (42) were interviewed and a 5 year retrospective data was collected. An average family size, land holding and herd size of the respondents were 6.072.11persons, 2.341.9 hectare and 12.19 7.6 heads of cattle per household respectively. Land shortage, seasonal feed scarcity, ineffective crossbreeding and disease prevalence were among the major constraints of smallholder dairy cattle production in the study area. From a total of 129 pregnant dairy cows monitored for major reproductive health disorders, 51(39.5%) of them were observed with one or more of reproductive health disorders. Retained fetal membrane was frequently observed with the magnitude of 26(51%) among the cases, followed by abortion 13(25.5%) and dystocia 10(19.6%). A retrospective clinical case based prevalence of reproductive health problems at Guto Gida and Getema veterinary clinics were 56(2.1%) and 164(7.13%) respectively. The effect of herd size and management system on the occurrence of reproductive health during this study was insignificant since the p-values of each factor is greater than the alpha value (P>0.05). But level of parity and body condition of the animal significantly affects the prevalence of reproductive health disorders. Generally the prevalence of reproductive health disorders of dairy cattle in the study area is high accompanied by lack of improved breeding system. Interventions with improved dairy extension packages may minimize the constraints and improve milk production.
[Misgana D, Gebeyehu G. Assessment of Major Reproductive Health Disorders of Dairy Cattle in and around Nekemte town, East Wollega Zone, Ethiopia. Researcher 2017;9(11):82-89]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 12. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.12.

Keywords: Abortion, Dystocia, Retained Fetal Membrane, Retrospective, Prevalence, Follow up

Full Text

12

13

Comparative study of quality attributes and acceptability of ogiri: a condiment made from melon seeds, soya beans and African yam beans

Akinsola, A. O1*., Idowu, O. A2., Adeyeye, S. A. O3., and Akanbi, G. O1.

1Department of Home Economics, Federal College of Education (Special), Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria.
2Department of Food Technology, Federal Polytechnic, Offa, Kwara State, Nigeria.
3Department of Food Science and Technology, Mountain Top University, Km 12, Lagos-Ibadan Express Road, Prayer City, Ogun State, Nigeria.
*Correspondence author:
akinsola4gold@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Condiment has been in use from time immemorial to impact or improve food flavour and acceptability among ethnicity. This study investigated quality attributes and acceptability of ‘ogiri’, a condiment made from melon seeds, soya beans and African yam beans (AYB). Ogiri was produced from melon seeds, soya beans and African yam beans using the traditional processing method. Laboratory analyses were carried to evaluate proximate and chemical composition, antioxidant, microbial load, and sensory characteristics of the samples. The results showed a decrease in the moisture content of the samples after fermentation into ogiri was observed in the undehulled boiled seeds. The protein contents (%) were 9.86, 6.88 and 10.32 for dehulled boiled seeds; 9.97, 6.91 and 10.22 for undehulled boiled seeds, respectively. The fat contents (%) were 40.27, 26.88 and 12.00 for dehulled boiled seeds; 39.24, 27.02 and 11.38 for undehulled boiled seeds, respectively. The total energy supply by melon Ogiri was higher than soybean and AYB Ogiri. Flavonoid, alkaloids and total carotene content of melon Ogiri was higher than soybeans and AYB, while soybean Ogiri has more total phenol than melon and AYB Ogiri. Microbial load of AYB was lower than soybean and melon Ogiri, respectively. Sensory attributes showed that significant differences (p<0.05) existed among the various samples of the ogiri. Colour of melon ogiri was the most preferred by the judges followed by samples from soya beans and AYB, respectively. Melon ogiri gave the preferred aroma (P<0.05), while soybean Ogiri has the higher overall acceptability. The study showed that both melon and soybean Ogiri if hygienically produced would be accepted for Ogiri production.
[Akinsola, A. O ., Idowu, O. A ., Adeyeye, S. A. O ., and Akanbi, G. O . Comparative study of quality attributes and acceptability of ogiri: a condiment made from melon seeds, soya beans and African yam beans. Researcher 2017;9(11):90-94]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 13. doi:10.7537/marsrsj091117.13.

Key words: Condiment, food flavour, ogiri, overall acceptability, quality attributes

Full Text

13

The manuscripts in this issue were presented as online first for peer-review starting from October 16, 2017. 

All comments are welcome: editor@sciencepub.net

For back issues of the Researcher, click here.

Emails: researcher@sciencepub.neteditor@sciencepub.net 

Marsland Press: http://www.sciencepub.net

 

39-06 Main Street, #202, Flushing, NY 11354, USA. 718-404-5362, 347-321-7172

 

 

Terms of Service  |  Privacy Policy  |

2017 Marsland Press