Loading

 

Science Journal

 

Stem Cell 

ISSN: 1545-4570 (print); ISSN: 1945-4732 (online), doi:10.7537/j.issn.1945-4570, Quarterly

 Volume 6 - Issue 3  (Cumulated No. 23), September 25, 2015

Cover Page, Introduction, Contents, Call for Papers, Stem0603

 

You can use the message in end of the article abstract to cite it.

To get Microsoft Documents: After you open the "Full Text" for each article, change the last 3 characters of the web address from .pdf to .doc (or .docx)

Welcome to send your manuscript to: sciencepub@gmail.com

When you submit manuscript(s), please mention that it is submitted to Stem Cell

Marsland Press, PO Box 180432, Richmond Hill, New York 11418, USA, 347-321-7172

http://www.sciencepub.net/stem

 

CONTENTS  

No.

Titles / Authors /Abstracts

Full Text

No.

1

Stop Words in Persian language Stem

 

Shapur Reza Berenjian

 

Faculty Member with Regional Information Center for Science and Technology (RICeST)

Sh_berenjian@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: In modern systems of information storage and retrieval, searching methods are of special interest, since how to search and use appropriate words have direct effect on speed of retrieving, volume of space occupied in PC memory and user’s satisfaction. A group of words that are discussed by linguists are stop words, deleting of which will produce better results in indexing documents. Therefore preparing a list of stop words in each language requires knowing different criteria and methods. However, no standard stop word list has been extracted from Persian language texts up to now. This article aims at providing instructions and criteria for preparing stop word list in Persian language in order to develop information retrieval systems.

[S.H. Berenjian. Stop Words in Persian language Stem. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):1-5]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 1. doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.01

 

Key words: Stop words, Information retrieval, Semi- stop words, Stop word list, Persian language.

Full Text

1

2

Occurrence of Pathogens in Patients with Indwelling Urinary Catheter at Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, South-west Nigeria

 

Olaboopo AO1, Shobayo BI1, Ogiogwa J2, Ojo DA1

 

1.  Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

2.  Microbiology Unit, Pathology Department, Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

bodeshobayo@gmail.com, daojo3@yahoo.com, ayo225@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: The objective of this study was to identify bacteria associated with UTI in patients with indwelling urinary catheter prior to determining their susceptibility patterns to commonly used antibiotics. A total of 114 bacterial isolates were identified with gram negative bacteria (P. aeruginosa, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. mirabilis) representing 97 (85.1%) of the isolates and gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) making up 17 (14.9%). The commonest isolate observed was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 40 (35.1%), followed by Escherichia coli 35 (30.7%), Staphylococcus aureus 16 (14%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 14 (12.3%), Proteus mirabilis 8 (7%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis 1 (0.9%). Polymicrobial growth was observed in 62.6% of both catheter tip and catheter urine samples while 19.4% of both samples showed monomicrobial growth. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the gram negative bacteria showed high resistance to commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline (85.5%), gentamicin (93.8%), ampicillin (99%), cotrimoxazole (81.4%), nitrofurantoin (82.5%), penicillin (96.9%), chloramphenicol (88.7%) and erythromycin (88.7%). Significant resistance was shown by the gram positive bacteria to both gentamicin and penicillin at 88.2% and ampicillin (100%).

[Olaboopo A O, Shobayo B I, Ogiogwa J, Ojo D A. Occurrence of Pathogens in Patients with Indwelling Urinary Catheter at Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, South-west Nigeria. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):6-11]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 2

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.02

 

Key words: pathogens; patients; indwelling urinary catheter

Full Text

2

3

Response of Saeidy Date Palms Grown Under New Valley Conditions to Spraying Salicylic Acid and Seaweed Extract

 

Faissal F., Ahmed 1, Ali H. Ali 1 and Abbas S. Abdalla 2 and Emad M. E. Shazly 2

 

1 Hort. Dept. Fac. of Agric. Minia Univ. Egypt.

2 Tropical Fruits Dept. Hort. Res. Institute ARC, Giza, Egypt

faissalfadel@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: This study was conducted during 2013 and 2014 seasons to examine the effect of single and combined applications of salicylic acid at 0.0 to 0.2 % and seaweed extract at 0.0 to 4 % on growth, palm nutritional status, flowering, fruit setting, yield and fruit quality of Saeidy date palms grown under New Valley environmental conditions. The selected palms received four sprays from each biostimulant. Treating the palms four times with salicylic acid at 0.05 to 0.2% and / or seaweed extract at 1 to 4 % was very effective in improving growth characters, palm nutritional status, flowering, fruit setting, yield and fruit quality over the check treatment. The promotion was materially associated with increasing concentrations. Meaningless promotion on these characters was observed with increasing concentrations of salicylic acid from 0.1 to 0.2% and seaweed extract from 2 to 4%. The best results with regard to yield and fruit quality of Saeidy date palms grown under New Valley conditions were obtained due to spraying the palms four times with a mixture of 0.1% salicylic acid plus 2 % seaweed extract.

[Faissal F, Ahmed, Ali H Ali, Abbas S Abdalla and Emad M E Shazly. Response of Saeidy Date Palms Grown Under New Valley Conditions to Spraying Salicylic Acid and Seaweed Extract. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):12-19]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 3

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.03

 

Keywords: Salicylic acid, seaweed extract, Saeidy date palms, growth, flowering, yield, fruit quality

Full Text

3

4

Using Some Organic Manures and Effective Microorganisms as a Partial Replacement of Mineral N Fertilizer in Sukkary Mango Orchards

 

Faissal F. Ahmed1, Farouk H. Abdel Aziz1, Ahmed Y. Mohamed2 and Sahr Abd El – Reheem Abd El-Haleem2

 

1Hort. Dept. Fac. of Agric. Minia.Minia. Egypt

2Tropical Fruits Dept. Hort. Res. Instit. ARC, Giza, Egypt

E-mail: faissalfadel@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: This study was carried out during 2013 and 2014 seasons to examine the effect of using three organic manures namely plant compost (2%N), filter mud (2%N) and chicken manure (2.5%) applied at 50 to 75% of the suitable N (1000 g N/tree/year) with or without Effective microorganisms at 50 to 100 ml/tree/year as an attempt for reducing inorganic N partially in Sukkary mango orchards under Aswan conditions. Supplying the trees with N via 50% inorganic plus 50% any organic manures with or without biofertilization with EM had a striking effect on all growth characters leaf pigments, nutrients, yield and fruit quality comparing with using N as 100% inorganic N or when inorganic N was applied at 25% of N even with the application of organic and biofertilization. The best organic manures in this connection was chicken manure followed by filter mud and compost. Organic fertilization enriched with EM was materially superior than using organic fertilization alone. A great decline on the yield was observed with N was applied as 25% inorganic N + 75% plant compost. The best results with regard to yield and fruit quality of Sukkary mango trees grown under Aswan conditions were obtained due to supplying the trees with N (1000g N/tree) through 50% inorganic N + 50% chicken manure enriched with Effective microorganisms at 50 ml/tree/year.

[Faissal F. Ahmed, Farouk H. Abdel Aziz, Ahmed Y. Mohamed and Sahr Abd El – Reheem Abd El-Haleem. Using Some Organic Manures and Effective Microorganisms as a Partial Replacement of Mineral N Fertilizer in Sukkary Mango Orchards Cell. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):20-32]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 4

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.04

 

Keywords: Inorganic Nitrogen, plant compost, chicken manure, filter mud, EM, Sukkarymango, yield, fruit quality

Full Text

4

5

Effect of Replacement of Inorganic N Fertilizer Partially By Using Plant Compost and EM on Productivity of Sakkoti Date Palms

 

Moawad A. Mohamed, Hamdy I. Mahmoud; Mohamed A. El- Sayed and Ahmed H.A. Ahmed

 

Hort. Dept. Fac. of Agric. Minia Univ. Egypt

E. mail: faissalfadel@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: The effect of replacing 25 to 70% inorganic N partially by using 12.5 to 35% plant compost and 125 to 350 ml EM/ palm/ year on growth, palm nutritional status, flowering, fruit setting, yield, fruit quality and both nitrate and nitrite in the pulp of Sakkoti date palms was investigated during 2013 and 2014 seasons. Growth, flowering, fruit setting, yield and bunch weight were maximized with supplying the palms with N as 60% inorganic N + 20% plant compost + 200 ml EM/ palm/ year. Palm nutritional status, both physical and chemical characteristics of the fruits and nitrate and nitrite in the pulp were remarkably improved by replacing 70% of inorganic by 35% plant compost and 350 ml EM/ palm / year. Carrying out N fertilization in Sakkoti date palm orchards by replacing 40% of inorganic N by using 20% plant compost and 200 ml EM/ palm/ year was beneficial for producing an economical yield, improving fruit quality and reducing pollution with nitrate and nitrite in the pulp.

[Moawad A. Mohamed, Hamdy I. Mahmoud; Mohamed A. El- Sayed and Ahmed H.A. Ahmed. Effect of Replacement of Inorganic N Fertilizer Partially By Using Plant Compost and EM on Productivity of Sakkoti Date Palms. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):33-44]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 5

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.05

 

Key words: plant compost, EM, yield, fruit quality and pollution with nitrate and nitrite

Full Text

5

6

Tolerance of Some Grapevine Cultivars to Salinity and Calcium Carbonate in the Soil

 

Faissal F. Ahmed1, Ahmed M.K. Abdel Aal1; Mervat A. Aly2 and Soaad E.A. Ahmed3

 

1Hort. Dept. Fac. of Agric. Minia Univ.

2Viticulture Dept. Hort. Res. Instit. ARC, Giza.

3 Central Laboratory of organic Agric. Hort. Res. Instit. ARC, Giza.

E mail. faissalfadel@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: During 2013 and 2014 seasons transplants of four grapevine cvs Flame seedless, Ruby seedless, crimson seedless and Superior were subjected to salinity at 0.05 to 0.4% and calcium carbonate at 2.5 to 20% in the soil. The target was detecting the tolerance of these grapevine cvs to salinity and lime in the soil. Transplants of grapevine cv Flame seedless and Ruby seedless recorded the highest values of growth and root characters, leaf relative turgidity, leaf succulence grade, pigments, total carbohydrates, total soluble sugars and uptake of N, P and K and the lowest values of and uptake of Ca, Na and Cl. Increasing concentrations of salinity from 0.0 to.4% and calcium carbonate from 0.0 to 20% was followed by reducing all parameters except soluble sugars, and uptake of Ca, Na and Cl. Salinity had injurious effects on grapevine transplants than calcium carbonate. Based on the highest values of growth and roots as well as leaf relative turgidity and leaf succulence grade, Flame seedless grapevine cv was more tolerant to salinity and lime in the soil, since it tolerated salinity till 0.2% and lime till 10% followed by Ruby seedless that tolerated 0.1% salinity and 5% lime. Subjecting the transplants of all the investigated grapevine cvs to salinity at 0.4% and lime at 20% resulted in a great damage on the transplants.

[Faissal F. Ahmed, Ahmed M.K. Abdel Aal; Mervat A. Aly and Soaad E.A. Ahmed. Tolerance of Some Grapevine Cultivars to Salinity and Calcium Carbonate in the Soil. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):45-64]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 6

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.06

 

Keywords: tolerance, salinity, calcium carbonate, growth grapevine cvs

Full Text

6

7

Occurrence of Pathogens in Patients with Indwelling Urinary Catheter at Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, South-west Nigeria

 

Olaboopo AO1, Shobayo BI1, Ogiogwa J2, Ojo DA1

 

1.  Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

2.  Microbiology Unit, Pathology Department, Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

bodeshobayo@gmail.com, daojo3@yahoo.com, ayo225@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: The objective of this study was to identify bacteria associated with UTI in patients with indwelling urinary catheter prior to determining their susceptibility patterns to commonly used antibiotics. A total of 114 bacterial isolates were identified with gram negative bacteria (P. aeruginosa, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. mirabilis) representing 97 (85.1%) of the isolates and gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) making up 17 (14.9%). The commonest isolate observed was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 40 (35.1%), followed by Escherichia coli 35 (30.7%), Staphylococcus aureus 16 (14%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 14 (12.3%), Proteus mirabilis 8 (7%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis 1 (0.9%).  Polymicrobial growth was observed in 62.6% of both catheter tip and catheter urine samples while 19.4% of both samples showed monomicrobial growth. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the gram negative bacteria showed high resistance to commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline (85.5%), gentamicin (93.8%), ampicillin (99%), cotrimoxazole (81.4%), nitrofurantoin (82.5%), penicillin (96.9%), chloramphenicol (88.7%) and erythromycin (88.7%). Significant resistance was shown by the gram positive bacteria to both gentamicin and penicillin at 88.2% and ampicillin (100%).

[Olaboopo A O, Shobayo B I, Ogiogwa J, Ojo D A. Occurrence of Pathogens in Patients with Indwelling Urinary Catheter at Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, South-west Nigeria. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):65-70]. (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net. 7

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.07

 

Key words: pathogens; patients; indwelling urinary catheter

Full Text

7

8

Induced pluripotent stem cells literatures

 

Ma Hongbao 1, Margaret Young 2, Yan Yang 1

 

1 Brookdale Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 11212, USA; 2 Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

ma8080@gmail.com

 

Abstract: All animal cells come from stem cells. Stem cell pluripotency means a stem cell having the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm or ectoderm. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be differentiated to any fetal or adult cell type. However, the pluripotent stem cells cannot develop into a fetal or adult organism alone because they are lack of the potential to contribute to extraembryonic tissue, such as the placenta. iPS cells are genetically reprogrammed adult cells that exhibit a pluripotent stem cell-like state similar to embryonic stem cells. While these artificially generated cells are not known to exist in the human body, they show qualities remarkably similar to those of embryonic stem cells (ESCs); thus, iPSCs are an invaluable resource for drug discovery, cell therapy, and basic research. Here are the xxx academic literature collections on iPS.

[Ma H, Young M, Yang Y. Induced pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cell. 2015;6(3):71-101] (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net/stem.  8

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.08

 

Key words: DNA; life; stem cell; induced pluripotent; literature

Full Text

8

9

A Brief Introducing of Stem Cell

 

Ma Hongbao *, Yang Yang *, Margaret Ma **

 

* Brookdale Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 11212, USA, ma8080@gmail.com

** Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA

 

Abstract: The definition of stem cell is “an unspecialized cell that gives rise to a specific specialized cell, such as a blood cell”. Embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst stage embryos. Somatic stem cells differentiate into only the cells the specific tissue wherein they reside. Stem Cell is the original of life. All cells come from stem cells.

[Ma H, Yang Y, Ma M. A Brief Introducing of Stem Cell. Stem Cell 2015;6(3):102-104] (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net/stem. 9

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.09

 

Keywords: DNA; gene; life; protein; stem cell

Full Text

9

10

Stem Cell and Aging Research Literatures

 

Ma Hongbao 1, Margaret Young 2, Yang Yan 1

 

1 Brookdale Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 11212, USA; 2 Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

ma8080@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Stem cells are derived from embryonic and non-embryonic tissues. Most stem cell studies are for animal stem cells and plants have also stem cell. Stem cells were discovered in 1981 from early mouse embryos. Stem cells have the potential to develop into all different cell types in the living body. Stem cell is a body repair system. When a stem cell divides it can be still a stem cell or become adult cell, such as a brain cell. Stem cells are unspecialized cells and can renew themselves by cell division, and stem cells can also differentiate to adult cells with special functions. Stem cells replace the old cells and repair the damaged tissues. Embryonic stem cells can become all cell types of the body because they are pluripotent. Adult stem cells are thought to be limited to differentiating into different cell types of their tissue of origin. This article introduces recent research reports as references in the related studies.

[Ma H, Young M, Yang Y. Stem Cell and Aging Research Literatures. Stem Cell. 2015;6(3):105-118] (ISSN 1545-4570). http://www.sciencepub.net/stem. 10

doi:10.7537/marsscj050315.10

 

Keywords: stem cell; life; research; literature; aging

Full Text

10

The manuscripts in this issue were presented as online first for peer-review, starting from May 22, 2015

All comments are welcome: sciencepub@gmail.com

For back issues of the Stem Cell, click here.

Emails: editor@sciencepub.net; sciencepub@gmail.com

Website: http://www.sciencepub.net/stem

Welcome to send your manuscript to: sciencepub@gmail.com 

When you submit manuscript(s), please mention that it is submitted to the Stem Cell.

 

Marsland Press

PO Box 180432, Richmond Hill, New York 11418, USA, 347-321-7172.

Welcome to send your manuscript to: sciencepub@gmail.com 

Introduction; Call for Papers; Scientific Journal List; Useful Links; Manuscript Preparation; Manuscript Example-1

 

 

 

 

2015 Marsland Press, http://www.sciencepub.net

 

 

 

 

Web counter since January 1, 2009